There’s nothing more certain than getting older and eventually dying. But what about in between if  you become incapacitated? Proper planning can help ensure that your estate is in good hands as you age when the risk of incapacity increases whether due to illness, accident or other factors. Incapacity planning is so important and a vital part of the estate planning process. After all, estate planning is not just about planning for your death – it includes spelling out who should make decisions on your behalf when you become unable to. Without an incapacity plan in place, a judge can appoint someone to take control and make decisions on your behalf – only you know who that person should be better than the court.

So, first, start thinking about who you would want to make decisions on your behalf in regards to your financial affairs (which is done through the Durable Power of Attorney) and medical care (through the Living Will & Patient Advocate Designation) should you become unable to for yourself. Some people want a different person to manage their financial affairs and someone else to make health care decisions.

Contact me if you have any questions about Durable Powers of Attorney or Living Wills & Patient Advocate Designations!

Leave a Reply